My Blog

Posts for: April, 2015

By Mesick Dental Center & Denture Care
April 25, 2015
Category: Oral Health
Tags: dentures  
TheDenturesAreComing

How much do you really know about Revolutionary War hero and famous disturber-of-the-peace Paul Revere? Take this quiz and find out! True or False:

  1. Paul Revere cried “The British are coming!”
  2. Paul Revere rode to Concord, Massachusetts.
  3. Paul Revere practiced dentistry.

The first two answers are false: Revere, like most colonists, considered himself British at the time (but might have said “the regulars” are coming); and he never made it as far as Concord, though one of his midnight-riding companions did. The last statement, however, is true: When things got slow in his regular trade of silversmithing, Revere hung out a shingle to broadcast his skills as a dentist.

“Paul Revere can fix [teeth] as well as any surgeon dentist who ever came from London, he fixes [dentures] in such a manner that they are not only an ornament but of real use in speaking and eating,” his advertisement in a Boston newspaper is supposed to have read. Revere specialized in fitting dentures made of metal and walrus ivory in his patient’s mouths. (There is no record, however, that he ever worked on George Washington’s false teeth.)

The practice of dentistry has come a long way since 1776. But the ideal set of dentures — one that’s both aesthetically pleasing and fully functional — remains a valid goal today. But now, instead of going to a metalworker, you’ll visit a denture specialist: your dentist.

We understand that dentures need to have a perfect, comfortable fit so they can do their work. That’s why we take the time to make an individual mold of your mouth as the first step of the process. Then we choose prosthetic teeth in the shape, size and shade that’s right for you. When everything is satisfactory, the dentures will be custom-fabricated in a dental laboratory using high-quality materials that are lifelike and durable. Finally, we will make sure that your new dentures look, feel and function the way they should.

If you have older dentures that no longer fit as they should, come in to our office for a check-up. It’s sometimes possible to repair or re-line dentures; in other cases, it’s best to have a new set made. Ill-fitting dentures aren’t just uncomfortable — they can also lead to oral infections and nutritional difficulties.

For more information about dentures or denture repair, please contact our office to schedule a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Loose Dentures” and “Removable Full Dentures.”


By Mesick Dental Center & Denture Care
April 10, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
TomHanksAbscessedToothGetsCastAway

Did you see the move Cast Away starring Tom Hanks? If so, you probably remember the scene where Hanks, stranded on a remote island, knocks out his own abscessed tooth — with an ice skate, no less — to stop the pain. Recently, Dear Doctor TV interviewed Gary Archer, the dental technician who created that special effect and many others.

“They wanted to have an abscess above the tooth with all sorts of gunk and pus and stuff coming out of it,” Archer explained. “I met with Tom and I took impressions [of his mouth] and we came up with this wonderful little piece. It just slipped over his own natural teeth.” The actor could flick it out with his lower tooth when the time was right during the scene. It ended up looking so real that, as Archer said, “it was not for the easily squeamish!”

That’s for sure. But neither is a real abscess, which is an infection that becomes sealed off beneath the gum line. An abscess may result from a trapped piece of food, uncontrolled periodontal (gum) disease, or even an infection deep inside a tooth that has spread to adjacent periodontal tissues. In any case, the condition can cause intense pain due to the pressure that builds up in the pus-filled sac. Prompt treatment is required to relieve the pain, keep the infection from spreading to other areas of the face (or even elsewhere in the body), and prevent tooth loss.

Treatment involves draining the abscess, which usually stops the pain immediately, and then controlling the infection and removing its cause. This may require antibiotics and any of several in-office dental procedures, including gum surgery, a root canal, or a tooth extraction. But if you do have a tooth that can’t be saved, we promise we won’t remove it with an ice skate!

The best way to prevent an abscess from forming in the first place is to practice conscientious oral hygiene. By brushing your teeth twice each day for two minutes, and flossing at least once a day, you will go a long way towards keeping harmful oral bacteria from thriving in your mouth.

If you have any questions about gum disease or abscesses, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Periodontal (Gum) Abscesses” and “Confusing Tooth Pain.”